Our Sweet 16

Yesterday was a proud day for me; Aegis turned “Sweet 16.” I started this company armed with a “black box” full of ideas, a heart full of passion, and a stomach full of butterflies. I hoped to build something far different in senior housing than what I had seen done in the industry to that point. I wanted to be more creative, to give our residents a voice no matter their cognitive state, and be a champion for our staff during their times of need. This resulted in two founding principles: provide the best care to our residents, and take care of our employees who will provide the best caregiving.

When I think of where we are today; these original ideas and principles are still paramount to our family-owned company. We not only aspire to have them but have actualized them, because we aren’t driven by quarterly profits but rather by our compassion. Our success has come from hiring like-minded people who bond together under the premise of doing the right thing for this frail and vulnerable population.

When I started my career 28 years ago, the assisted living concept was first introduced because family members demanded an alternative to the medical institutions and skilled nursing homes. Consumers wanted residential settings that were less clinical for their aging loved ones. The success of the assisted living concept is a model built on “shared risk.” The assisted living community that oversees the resident, the medical doctor(s) who care for them and the family who knows them best, all must participate in the holistic care of the individual for success.

Assisted living communities have now evolved to be a balance of both care and emotional support. Our Chief Medical Officer is vigilant about our quality of care and the exemplary training of our care managers and nursing staff. But just as important as meeting their care needs is meeting their emotional needs – including loneliness, depression, frustration, and confusion.

When my mom was suffering from the late stages of Alzheimer’s, I knew that her happiness was found in the smallest moments of joy – holding her hand, dancing to Frank Sinatra, a soft blanket, or French fries. Every day Aegis strives to bring these simple pleasures to our residents in both big and small ways. This business is personal to me. This is how I honor my mother. And I want to provide every resident with the best quality of life that we can.

My goal for the future as a company, and for our industry, is to better educate society about the realities of aging and the choices that you have in your own care. As the Baby Boomer generation ages, it is time to take a long, hard look at how you wish to spend your final stages of life and to really understand all the choices that you have in front of you. While there is no cure for old age – there is comfort, dignity and care for the aging.

 

2 Comments

  1. Marlene Motola
    Posted July 31, 2013 at 6:07 pm | Permalink

    The website links to the research on demential and Alzheimer’s is very informative.
    Thank you for posting them.

  2. Pamela Parker
    Posted August 1, 2013 at 4:26 pm | Permalink

    What a beautiful entry. I too entered the AL field specifically because families sought alternative social models of care prior to needing skilled long term care. In the early 90′s none existed in areas of Texas. It was either illegal care homes or nursing homes. Watching the industry grow, and the appreciation of residents and families was heart-warming. It is an awesome responsibility to work with residents and families, but one I think many of us would never, ever trade for the world. And, knowing we help make the difference and can provide choice is heartening and humbling!

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